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Eggs

Eggs are packed with nutrition and are so wonderfully versatile to use in cooking that they hands down deserve to be the first Food of the Week!

They can be fried, boiled, scrambled, poached, steamed, creamed, deviled, curried, pickled... They can be made into omelettes, custards, frittatas, french toast, quiches, meringues, egg salad... They are used in cakes, sauces, glazes, icing... I think you get the idea, the lists really do go on and on.

Eggs are a staple in so many recipes, so it's a good idea to keep them well stocked. With so many creative ways of serving eggs, your toddler will never get bored of them! Which is fantastic because not only are they versatile they are amazingly good for you as well.

Eggs are a rich natural source of high quality protein and omega-3 fats, as well as over 11 different vitamins and minerals (including Folate, Calcium, Vitamin B12, Vitamin A, Iodine, Vitamin E, Iron, Zinc and Vitamin D)

100g of whole raw Australian egg contains:

12.2g of protein
9.9g of fat
383mg cholesterol
1.3g carbohydrate
0.3g sugars

There is a fantastic website filled with in-depth nutritional data on Australian eggs, I encourage you to have a read! (http://www.eggs.org.au)

In the 2013 Australian Dietary Guidelines, eggs are part of the lean meats, poultry, fish, eggs, tofu, nuts and seeds, and legumes/beans group. The guideline recommends 1-3 serves a day of this food group for children and adults, depending on their age and gender.

It also states that "there do not appear to be any increased health risks associated with consumption of eggs" and despite what you may have heard about eating eggs daily increasing your risk of heart disease, "there is recent evidence to suggest that consumption of eggs every day is not associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease."

Good news! Because my toddler just loves them.






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